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Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute


Institut aéronautique et spatial du Canada

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  • January 17, 2020 7:03 AM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    Scanning electron micrograph of a dated presolar silicon carbide grain. The grain is ~8 micrometers in its longest dimension. CREDIT Image courtesy of Janaína N. Ávila.

    Stars have life cycles. They're born when bits of dust and gas floating through space find each other and collapse in on each other and heat up. They burn for millions to billions of years, and then they die.

    When they die, they pitch the particles that formed in their winds out into space, and those bits of stardust eventually form new stars, along with new planets and moons and meteorites. And in a meteorite that fell fifty years ago in Australia, scientists have now discovered stardust that formed 5 to 7 billion years ago-the oldest solid material ever found on Earth.

    "This is one of the most exciting studies I've worked on," says Philipp Heck, a curator at the Field Museum, associate professor at the University of Chicago, and lead author of a paper describing the findings in PNAS. "These are the oldest solid materials ever found, and they tell us about how stars formed in our galaxy."

    Read full store on astrobiology.com...

  • January 03, 2020 10:01 AM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    Areas for Potential Collaboration

    CASI and CSEO will identify and give effect to opportunities that are expected to be mutually beneficial, including:

    • Organising joint activities to further the objectives of the Parties;
    • Offering special benefits for members of both organisations such as discounts and other considerations at conferences, meetings, etc;
    • Sharing information about networking opportunities that are intended to attract students and young professionals to the space sector in Canada and Cyprus;
    • Working together to generate enthusiasm for space programs in Canada and Cyprus on the part of the general public, and through space-related activities to underscore the benefits of investment in space to responsible levels of government in Canada and Cyprus;
    • Cooperating in the design of new programmes, platforms, infrastructure and global alliances related to science and innovation and the interdisciplinary growth of science, innovation, education, entrepreneurship and space initiatives;
    • Organising conferences, workshops, brokering events and public knowledge initiatives with the participation of space industry, leading science, innovation and technology experts which compose the networks, community and professional horizon of the Parties

    Read the full MOU...

  • December 23, 2019 5:14 PM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    Airbus unveiled the iconic RCAF yellow search and rescue livery on the C-295 in October. Airbus Photo

    Posted on December 20, 2019 by Skies Magazine

    The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) took delivery of its first Airbus CC-295 fixed-wing search and rescue (FWSAR) aircraft on Dec. 18.

    The delivery itself seems to have been a low-key event without much fanfare. An Airbus spokesperson told Skies on Dec. 20 that the OEM had no plans to publish an official press release about the delivery. However, he referenced a brief tweet on the Airbus Defence & Space Twitter account, which was posted on Dec. 20, two days after the delivery reportedly occurred.

    In November, Skies reported that complications with the CC-295’s technical manuals could delay the first delivery. Airbus unveiled the aircraft in RCAF livery in mid-October.

    Read more on Skies Magazine

  • September 26, 2019 8:40 AM | April Duffy (Administrator)

    Flights could be very quick in years to come thanks to a new and very powerful plane engine. Flying to New York could take just one hour and a trip to Australia could be over in four hours with the new technology. UK firm Reaction Engines is creating the super engine that could see holidaymakers jetting around the world at top speed. The technology company has said it intends to deliver a “truly versatile propulsion system".


    Flights: The new engine will be “a hybrid air-breathing rocket engine" (Image: Reaction Engines)


    It will be “a hybrid air-breathing rocket engine that can power an aircraft from a standing start to over five times the speed of sound for hypersonic flight in the atmosphere.”

    The engine is dubbed the Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) and “represents a defining moment in powered flight.” It will also power spacecraft.

    Read More...
    Source Express

  • August 22, 2019 9:04 AM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    2019-08-19

    The Canadian Space Agency has awarded two contracts for external robotics interfaces in preparation for Canadarm3, Canada's contribution to the US-led Lunar Gateway.

    These interfaces will permit Canadarm3 to attach and operate on the exterior of the Gateway modules.

    The first contract is awarded to MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates (MDA), a Maxar company. The contract covers concept and technology development activities of robotics interfaces for the "exploration large arm," or XLA.

    The second contract is also awarded to MDA, a Maxar company. The contract covers concept and technology development activities of robotics interfaces for the smaller "exploration dexterous arm," or XDA.

    The contracts have a combined value of approximately $7 million (excluding taxes).

    Read more...

  • March 01, 2019 11:26 AM | Todd Legault (Administrator)


    Saint-Hubert, Quebec - February 28, 2019

    From pioneering satellite communications technologies to building the ‘Canadarm’ and space-based radar systems, Canada has made key contributions to space science and technology for close to six decades. Investing in science, innovation, and research unlocks new opportunities for economic growth, creates thousands of jobs for hard-working Canadians, and helps us understand the world we live in and our place in it.

    Fifty years after the Moon landing, space exploration is entering a new chapter – and Canada will play a big role in it. The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced Canada’s new partnership in the NASA-led Lunar Gateway – a project that will see humans return to the Moon and set the stage for further exploration to Mars.

    The Gateway is a Moon outpost that will provide living space for astronauts, a docking station for visiting spacecraft, and laboratories for research. Canada will develop and contribute a smart robotic system – Canadarm3 – that will repair and maintain the Gateway.

    Canada’s partnership in the Gateway ushers in a new era of Canadian excellence in space, and will be the cornerstone of Canada’s new, ambitious space strategy. The Government of Canada will invest $2.05 billion over 24 years for Canada’s space program. This investment will create hundreds of good, well-paying jobs over the next ten years – from scientists and engineers to technicians and computer programmers – and will contribute $100 million annually to Canada’s gross domestic product.

    Read Full Story

  • January 18, 2019 12:40 PM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    Farewell to the Good Old Days
    by David R. Greatrix

    Farewell to the Good Old Days is a lively and intimate tale by David Greatrix, a man who has lived a dynamic professional life, first as an aerospace engineer and then as a professor of the subject. The book, leaning heavily on the actual life experiences of Greatrix and a number of his academic colleagues close and far away, is divided into two discrete parts; the book’s narrator for both parts is nominally a fictional consolidated representation of Greatrix, drawing from various sources in addition to the author. Part One covers the narrator’s childhood and early adulthood, followed by his moving into his years of growth as a professional breaking into the challenging field of aerospace engineering. Part Two tracks the narrator’s subsequent twenty-five-year academic career as a professor of aerospace engineering at a university in a major urban centre.

    Prominent in this story are the many challenges the narrator encounters in his navigation of academe in a high-profile setting for engineering education. In an emotional narrative that never strays far from various shades of humour, the narrator shares the details of his teaching and research experience at this institution, frequently bumping up against the pointy bits of an evolving cosmopolitan academic culture.

    In colourful detail, the narrator reveals the small successes, notable failures, unexpected events, and crushing disappointments that describe his tenure at his university. The narrator is especially candid in his revelations about episodes of betrayal. He takes aim at big targets, including the Canadian government, university administrators, and the academic superstructure as a whole. The result is an enlightening view into an individual’s complicated experience in a demanding world that serves as a microcosm of society at large.

    Author Website | Purchase Your Copy

  • December 04, 2018 8:45 AM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    2019 Call for Applications

    The International Astronautical Federation (IAF) is pleased to announce its 2019 Emerging Space Leaders (ESL) Grant Programme that provides opportunities for students and young professionals to participate in the annual International Astronautical Congress.

    The young people selected to take part in the 2019 Emerging Space Leaders Grant Programme will participate in the 70th International Astronautical Congress (IAC) scheduled to take place in Washington D.C., United States, from 21 – 25 October 2019. The individuals selected will also participate in other activities held the week prior to and during the Congress such as the UN/IAF Workshop, the Space Generation Congress (SGC) or the Young Professionals Workshop; the Cross-Cultural Communications and Presentation Workshop; and IAF International Student Workshop.

    Students and Young Professionals between the ages of 21 and 35 on 1 January 2019 with space-related career interests are encouraged to apply to the programme. Up to twenty-five students and young professionals will be selected by the IAF to participate in the 2019 programme.

    Read the full atricle

  • November 20, 2018 10:20 AM | April Duffy (Administrator)

    Canada is a nation founded by explorers. As a child, I enjoyed reading stories of our Indigenous Peoples, the Vikings, La Vérendrye, Sir Alexander Mackenzie and others. Their exploits are vital threads of Canada’s national fabric; their personality traits – vision, perseverance, courage – distinguished early Canadians from other world citizens. Their ambition inspired me, as did John F. Kennedy, who declared that we explore space “not because it is easy, but because it is hard.”

    Read More by Robert Thirsk - Ottawa Citizen

  • November 09, 2018 10:34 AM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    “ABB Canada is very proud of its involvement with GOSAT-2," according to Quebec PQ based ABB Canada Space and Defense systems director Marc-Andre Soucy, who talked with this blog on Thursday morning.

    The TANSO-FTS, also known as the GOSAT interferometer subsystemSoucy and company have reason to be proud of their contribution to the second Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT-2), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) next generation satellite designed to monitor greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere.

    Read the full article on The Commercial Space Blog by Chuck Black

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