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Institut aéronautique et spatial du Canada

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  • April 08, 2019 1:41 PM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    Astronomers orchestrated radio dish telescopes across the world into an Earth-size virtual camera for a bold new experiment attempting to deliver the first-ever image of a black hole. The telescope collaboration is set to make a big announcement of results this week, and members also described their research approach at a talk in March.

    Black holes are extreme warps in space-time that are so strong, their massive gravity doesn't even let light escape once it gets close enough.

    The astronomers' idea is to photograph the circular opaque silhouette of a black hole cast on a bright background. The shadow's edge is the event horizon, a black hole's point of no return. A picture is worth a thousand words, and a photograph of a black hole would be an important tool for understanding astrophysics, cosmology and the role of black holes in the universe.

    Read Full Story on Space.com 


  • April 01, 2019 10:04 AM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    TORONTO, March 27, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Space Flight Laboratory (SFL) has been awarded the prime contract to develop the next generation cluster of formation-flying microsatellites for HawkEye 360 Inc. of Herndon, Va. The HawkEye Constellation, comprised of multiple clusters of three satellites each, is the first of its kind to detect and geolocate radio frequency (RF) signals for maritime, emergency response, and spectrum analysis applications.

    SFL built the platforms and integrated the HawkEye 360 Pathfinder cluster which was launched into low-Earth orbit in December 2018 and commissioned early this year. The three formation-flying Pathfinder microsatellites have successfully demonstrated geolocation of VHF, emergency position-indicating radio beacon (EPIRB), automatic identification system (AIS) and marine radar signals.

    “Through the development, launch and commissioning of our Pathfinder cluster, SFL demonstrated exceptional ability to deliver the solution we required,” said HawkEye 360 Founder and Chief Technology Officer Chris DeMay. “Their customer-first approach and engineering prowess resulted in the first-of-its-kind RF analytics we are generating today. We are proud to continue partnering with SFL on the development of our next set of spacecraft as we expand on-orbit capacity and enhance our capability to meet customer demands.”

    SFL is developing the next-generation cluster to service more sophisticated payloads as HawkEye 360 broadens its detection and geolocation capabilities. The cluster will incorporate SFL technologies that make on-orbit formation flying possible. Most prominent of these technologies is the high-performance attitude control system developed by SFL to keep micro- and nanosatellites stable in orbit.

    “The microsatellite bus selected by HawkEye 360 for the next-gen cluster is one we developed specifically to address the economics of commercial space activities,” said SFL Director Dr. Robert E. Zee.

    SFL satellite technology was selected for the HawkEye 360 Pathfinder mission due to the importance of formation flying by multiple satellites for successful RF signal geolocation and analysis. The relative positions of each satellite in the constellation must be known to accurately geolocate the transmission sources of the radio frequency signals. SFL first demonstrated affordable on-orbit formation control with smaller satellites in the 2014 Canadian CanX-4/CanX-5 mission.

    “We have developed compact, low-cost formation flying technology for commercial exploitation that is unmatched by any other satellite developer,” said Zee.

    Established in 1998 as a self-sustaining specialty lab at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS), SFL has built 25 nano- and microsatellites with nearly 100 cumulative years of successful operation in orbit to date.

    About Space Flight Laboratory (www.utias-sfl.net)

    SFL generates bigger returns from smaller, lower cost satellites. Small satellites built by SFL consistently push the performance envelope and disrupt the traditional cost paradigm. Satellites are built with advanced power systems, stringent attitude control and high-volume data capacity that are striking relative to the budget. SFL arranges launches globally and maintains a mission control center accessing ground stations worldwide. The pioneering and barrier breaking work of SFL is a key enabler to tomorrow’s cost aggressive satellite constellations. (www.utias-sfl.net)

    Follow SFL on Twitter @SFL_SmallerSats.

    About HawkEye 360

    HawkEye 360 is a Radio Frequency (RF) data analytics company. We operate a first-of-its-kind commercial satellite constellation to identify, process, and geolocate a broad set of RF signals. We extract value from this unique data through proprietary algorithms, fusing it with other sources to create powerful analytical products that solve hard challenges for our global customers. Our products include maritime domain awareness and spectrum mapping and monitoring; our customers include a wide range of commercial, government and international entities. (www.he360.com)

    Contacts:

    Dr. Robert E. Zee

    SFL Director

    1-416-667-7400

    info@utias-sfl.net


    Adam Bennett

    Product Marketing Director

    HawkEye 360 Inc.

    adam@he360.com

    +1 (571) 203-0360

  • March 19, 2019 1:48 PM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    The ICAO 2019 Prototypes Competition is for anyone 18-and-over. It's seeking maturely thought-out-3-D renderings (still images and/or video) of either new aircraft types or new types of operations.

    In addition to visual proposals submitted, we're also expecting a business case summary of 500 words or less which describes why your solution should attract investment, and how it be cost-effectively produced and implemented to improve people's lives.

    The prototypes submitted can be piloted or unmanned aircraft, of any size or shape, and there's no limit to what you can propose they can be used for in our skies and/or outer space.

    View Full Contest Details...

  • March 19, 2019 12:52 PM | Todd Legault (Administrator)


    Located above a strip of Spadina Avenue populated by nail salons, currency exchange vendors and a leather supply store, the fourth-floor office of Kepler Communications looks like that of any other tech startup – exposed heating ducts, open concept layout, a large conference table for meetings.

    That is, until you spot the control room.

    Inside the glass walls, an operator stares at a bank of six large computer screens that display data from Kepler’s tiny communications satellites as they streak overhead, from pole to pole, at an altitude of about 600 kilometres. Above his head are four clocks displaying the local times of Kepler’s ground-based antennae in Markham, Ont., Inuvik, N.W.T., and Svalbard, Norway, as well as co-ordinated universal time or UTC.

    Read the full story on U of T website...

  • March 04, 2019 9:48 AM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    CASI Members are now able to manage all aspects of their CASI Account using a mobile app. 

    • Search for other CASI Members and message them
    • See upcoming Events, Add them to your Calendar, Register and purchase extra tickets

    For more information and links to download the App for Android or iOS users, click here.

  • March 01, 2019 11:26 AM | Todd Legault (Administrator)


    Saint-Hubert, Quebec - February 28, 2019

    From pioneering satellite communications technologies to building the ‘Canadarm’ and space-based radar systems, Canada has made key contributions to space science and technology for close to six decades. Investing in science, innovation, and research unlocks new opportunities for economic growth, creates thousands of jobs for hard-working Canadians, and helps us understand the world we live in and our place in it.

    Fifty years after the Moon landing, space exploration is entering a new chapter – and Canada will play a big role in it. The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced Canada’s new partnership in the NASA-led Lunar Gateway – a project that will see humans return to the Moon and set the stage for further exploration to Mars.

    The Gateway is a Moon outpost that will provide living space for astronauts, a docking station for visiting spacecraft, and laboratories for research. Canada will develop and contribute a smart robotic system – Canadarm3 – that will repair and maintain the Gateway.

    Canada’s partnership in the Gateway ushers in a new era of Canadian excellence in space, and will be the cornerstone of Canada’s new, ambitious space strategy. The Government of Canada will invest $2.05 billion over 24 years for Canada’s space program. This investment will create hundreds of good, well-paying jobs over the next ten years – from scientists and engineers to technicians and computer programmers – and will contribute $100 million annually to Canada’s gross domestic product.

    Read Full Story

  • February 15, 2019 12:30 PM | April Duffy (Administrator)

    The Canadian Space Agency says it wants to hire ex-astronaut Dave Williams to help figure out how to get humans to Mars and back in one piece.

    But if you're also a medical doctor who's been to space and you think you can do a better job, please let the agency know.

    Williams is a doctor with experience on both the shuttle and International Space Station. The space agency posted plans Wednesday saying he will help them connect with medical experts and develop health-care solutions for future astronauts.

    "The CSA is hoping to be able to … leverage the expertise that we have in space medicine to create the next generation of on-board care capabilities for deep space exploration," Williams told The Canadian Press. Read more at thespec.com.


  • February 01, 2019 9:26 AM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    Teens looking to “leave ordinary behind” have an opportunity to attend NAV CANADA’s Explore Aviation Summer Camp this summer.

    This year, 24 young women and 24 young men from across Canada will gather at the NAV CENTRE in Cornwall for a week of learning, fun and friendship with a focus on aviation. Last summer, 30 students attended the first edition of the camp and it was an experience they described as “awesome” and “one of the best weeks of my life”.

    Students looking to apply must do so before March 8, 2019. Participants will be chosen from across Canada by a NAV CANADA committee made up of aviation professionals.

    Read the full story...


  • January 23, 2019 8:52 AM | April Duffy (Administrator)

    This weekend's stunning lunar eclipse seems to have come with a little extra flash, thanks to a brilliant coincidence — a burst of light at about the time totality began, marking the end of a meteorite's journey to the moon. The meteor strike takes place in the region darkened by Earth's shadow, as you can see in videos of the eclipse at Space.com.

  • January 18, 2019 12:40 PM | Todd Legault (Administrator)

    Farewell to the Good Old Days
    by David R. Greatrix

    Farewell to the Good Old Days is a lively and intimate tale by David Greatrix, a man who has lived a dynamic professional life, first as an aerospace engineer and then as a professor of the subject. The book, leaning heavily on the actual life experiences of Greatrix and a number of his academic colleagues close and far away, is divided into two discrete parts; the book’s narrator for both parts is nominally a fictional consolidated representation of Greatrix, drawing from various sources in addition to the author. Part One covers the narrator’s childhood and early adulthood, followed by his moving into his years of growth as a professional breaking into the challenging field of aerospace engineering. Part Two tracks the narrator’s subsequent twenty-five-year academic career as a professor of aerospace engineering at a university in a major urban centre.

    Prominent in this story are the many challenges the narrator encounters in his navigation of academe in a high-profile setting for engineering education. In an emotional narrative that never strays far from various shades of humour, the narrator shares the details of his teaching and research experience at this institution, frequently bumping up against the pointy bits of an evolving cosmopolitan academic culture.

    In colourful detail, the narrator reveals the small successes, notable failures, unexpected events, and crushing disappointments that describe his tenure at his university. The narrator is especially candid in his revelations about episodes of betrayal. He takes aim at big targets, including the Canadian government, university administrators, and the academic superstructure as a whole. The result is an enlightening view into an individual’s complicated experience in a demanding world that serves as a microcosm of society at large.

    Author Website | Purchase Your Copy

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